Vegas Organic Now a Featured Organic News Source

The curated news feed from VegasOrganic.com has been recognized as a leading source for organic news and shopping source for Las Vegas area consumbers looking for organic products and service in the local Vegas market

“We are proud to have this recognition so early in our expereince online” said Tom Pilzer of VegasOrganic.com. “We just opened up the site, with writers just now working on fresh content to add to the organic news, organic product updates and local Vegas organic shopping resources. Turns out, the market was ready for an all organic site and we’ve started getting inquiries before the site even went live”

Shoppers in the Las Vegas market looking for organic food stores, information on local organic gardening and even organic spas and organic facials can use VegasOrganic.com as a one stop source for things organic in Southern Nevada.

Plans include addition of local reporters, guest interviews with leading organic merchants, and links to organic products from all over the web.

VegasOrganic.com operates from Las Vegas and is privately funded. To learn more about VegasOrganic.com, visit the web site.

Vegas Entrepreneur Warren Whitlock Named Power Influencer by Forbes

Las Vegas: Vegas entrepreneur Warren Whitlock, publisher of this blog and others has been named a “Forbes top 10 social media power influencer”

Forbes Top Influencer Warren Whitlock
Vegas Entrepreneur Warren Whitlock

Whitlock, active online for the last 32 years, best-selling author, speaker and serial entrepreneur in publishing, advertising and marketing consulting and more commented “I am always happy to be acknowledged by these lists. None of these accolades suggest that there’s some competition and a winner but it’s nice to be included with colleagues that I know are helping business take advantage of the revolution in marketing that we currently call social media

“Social media tools that we have today have helped to enable a change from the 20th-century model of doing business where a centralized organization could push out a marketing message to the masses, limited only by the large budgets it took to communicate one way

“thanks to the Internet and especially these tools, consumers have the expectation that communications will be two-way conversations. Those businesses that learn to implement this in every part of their business will see their best years ever while those who continue to try to control a message and push consumers into old models will go downhill.”

Whitlock is the author of two best-selling books on social media, including the first book about Twitter and mobile marketing “Twitter Revolution: How Social Media and Mobile Marketing are Changing the Way We Do Business” and “Profitable Social Media: Business Results without Playing Games”

NASA cooking organics on ice to mimic life’s origins

(SPACE.com) Complex molecules can begin the transformation into life’s building blocks in the frigid depths of deep space, a new study suggests.

Researchers brewed up concoctions of organics — carbon-containing compounds — in icy conditions in the lab, then blasted them with radiation akin to that streaming from stars. They found that the organics morphed into the types of molecules that could have jump-started life on Earth.

“The very basic steps needed for the evolution of life may have started in the coldest regions of our universe,” lead author Murthy Gudipati, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., said in a statement. “We were surprised to see organic chemistry brewing up on ice, at these very cold temperatures in our lab.”

The origin of life’s building blocks

Many scientists think that the basic ingredients of life on Earth, including water and organic compounds, ultimately got their start on particles in the freezing outer reaches of the solar system. These particles glommed onto comets and asteroids, then found their way to our planet via long-ago impacts. [7 Theories on the Origin of Life]

The exact steps needed to go from icy organics to life’s building blocks remain unclear, but the new study may shed some light on the basic processes, researchers said. And it shows that the first steps can take place while the organics are still frozen in deep space.

Gudipati and co-author Rui Yang, also of JPL, studied a class of organics called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PAHs are common both on Earth — in candle soot and car exhaust, for example — and in space, having been spotted on comets and asteroids and in the planet-forming disks swirling around newborn stars.

The scientists mimicked the environment PAHs would experience in the quiet spaces between stars, where the molecules have also been detected. They exposed PAHs to temperatures as low as minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 268 degrees Celsius), bombarded the compounds with ultraviolet radiation similar to that thrown off by stars and used a laser system to identify the products of the resulting chemical reactions.

More complex organics

The researchers found that the PAHs had been transformed. The molecules incorporated hydrogen atoms into their structure, becoming more complex organics — a step along the path toward amino acids and nucleotides, the raw materials of proteins and DNA, respectively.

“PAHs are strong, stubborn molecules, so we were surprised to see them undergoing these chemical changes at such freezing-cold temperatures,” Gudipati said.

The study may also help explain why PAHs — which are pervasive throughout the cosmos as gases and on hot dust particles — have not yet been found on ice grains in space. They may be chemically transformed into other complex organics shortly after adhering to the frigid grains, researchers said.

The results are reported in the September issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Follow SPACE.com on Twitter @Spacedotcom. We’re also on Facebook  Google+.

Copyright 2012 SPACE.com, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

NASA Cooks Up Icy Organics to Mimic Life’s Origins




NASA's Icy Organics

Scientists are brewing up icy, organic concoctions in the lab to mimic materials at the edge of our solar system and beyond. At right: the lab equipment used to create the organic molecules at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. At left: An artist’s illustration of a planet-forming disk.
CREDIT: NASA/ JPL-Caltech


Complex molecules can begin the transformation into life’s building blocks in the frigid depths of deep space, a new study suggests.

Researchers brewed up concoctions of organics — carbon-containing compounds — in icy conditions in the lab, then blasted them with radiation akin to that streaming from stars. They found that the organics morphed into the types of molecules that could have jump-started life on Earth.

“The very basic steps needed for the evolution of life may have started in the coldest regions of our universe,” lead author Murthy Gudipati, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., said in a statement. “We were surprised to see organic chemistry brewing up on ice, at these very cold temperatures in our lab.”

The origin of life’s building blocks

Many scientists think that the basic ingredients of life on Earth, including water and organic compounds, ultimately got their start on particles in the freezing outer reaches of the solar system. These particles glommed onto comets and asteroids, then found their way to our planet via long-ago impacts. [7 Theories on the Origin of Life]

The exact steps needed to go from icy organics to life’s building blocks remain unclear, but the new study may shed some light on the basic processes, researchers said. And it shows that the first steps can take place while the organics are still frozen in deep space.

Gudipati and co-author Rui Yang, also of JPL, studied a class of organics called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PAHs are common both on Earth — in candle soot and car exhaust, for example — and in space, having been spotted on comets and asteroids and in the planet-forming disks swirling around newborn stars.

The scientists mimicked the environment PAHs would experience in the quiet spaces between stars, where the molecules have also been detected. They exposed PAHs to temperatures as low as minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 268 degrees Celsius), bombarded the compounds with ultraviolet radiation similar to that thrown off by stars and used a laser system to identify the products of the resulting chemical reactions.

More complex organics

The researchers found that the PAHs had been transformed. The molecules incorporated hydrogen atoms into their structure, becoming more complex organics — a step along the path toward amino acids and nucleotides, the raw materials of proteins and DNA, respectively.

“PAHs are strong, stubborn molecules, so we were surprised to see them undergoing these chemical changes at such freezing-cold temperatures,” Gudipati said.

The study may also help explain why PAHs — which are pervasive throughout the cosmos as gases and on hot dust particles — have not yet been found on ice grains in space. They may be chemically transformed into other complex organics shortly after adhering to the frigid grains, researchers said.

The results are reported in the September issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters.

This story was provided by SPACE.com, a sister site to LiveScience. Follow SPACE.com on Twitter @Spacedotcom. We’re also on Facebook  Google+.

NASA Cooks Up Icy Organics to Mimic Life’s Origins




NASA's Icy Organics

Scientists are brewing up icy, organic concoctions in the lab to mimic materials at the edge of our solar system and beyond. At right: the lab equipment used to create the organic molecules at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. At left: An artist’s illustration of a planet-forming disk.
CREDIT: NASA/ JPL-Caltech


Complex molecules can begin the transformation into life’s building blocks in the frigid depths of deep space, a new study suggests.

Researchers brewed up concoctions of organics — carbon-containing compounds — in icy conditions in the lab, then blasted them with radiation akin to that streaming from stars. They found that the organics morphed into the types of molecules that could have jump-started life on Earth.

“The very basic steps needed for the evolution of life may have started in the coldest regions of our universe,” lead author Murthy Gudipati, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., said in a statement. “We were surprised to see organic chemistry brewing up on ice, at these very cold temperatures in our lab.”

The origin of life’s building blocks

Many scientists think that the basic ingredients of life on Earth, including water and organic compounds, ultimately got their start on particles in the freezing outer reaches of the solar system. These particles glommed onto comets and asteroids, then found their way to our planet via long-ago impacts. [7 Theories on the Origin of Life]

The exact steps needed to go from icy organics to life’s building blocks remain unclear, but the new study may shed some light on the basic processes, researchers said. And it shows that the first steps can take place while the organics are still frozen in deep space.

Gudipati and co-author Rui Yang, also of JPL, studied a class of organics called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PAHs are common both on Earth — in candle soot and car exhaust, for example — and in space, having been spotted on comets and asteroids and in the planet-forming disks swirling around newborn stars.

The scientists mimicked the environment PAHs would experience in the quiet spaces between stars, where the molecules have also been detected. They exposed PAHs to temperatures as low as minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 268 degrees Celsius), bombarded the compounds with ultraviolet radiation similar to that thrown off by stars and used a laser system to identify the products of the resulting chemical reactions.

More complex organics

The researchers found that the PAHs had been transformed. The molecules incorporated hydrogen atoms into their structure, becoming more complex organics — a step along the path toward amino acids and nucleotides, the raw materials of proteins and DNA, respectively.

“PAHs are strong, stubborn molecules, so we were surprised to see them undergoing these chemical changes at such freezing-cold temperatures,” Gudipati said.

The study may also help explain why PAHs — which are pervasive throughout the cosmos as gases and on hot dust particles — have not yet been found on ice grains in space. They may be chemically transformed into other complex organics shortly after adhering to the frigid grains, researchers said.

The results are reported in the September issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters.

This story was provided by SPACE.com, a sister site to LiveScience. Follow SPACE.com on Twitter @Spacedotcom. We’re also on Facebook  Google+.

NASA Cooks Up Icy Organics to Mimic Life’s Origins




Scientists are brewing up icy, organic concoctions in the lab to mimic materials at the edge of our solar system and beyond.

Scientists are brewing up icy, organic concoctions in the lab to mimic materials at the edge of our solar system and beyond. At right: the lab equipment used to create the organic molecules at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. At left: An artist’s illustration of a planet-forming disk.
CREDIT: NASA/JPL-Caltech


Complex molecules can begin the transformation into life’s building blocks in the frigid depths of deep space, a new study suggests.

Researchers brewed up concoctions of organics — carbon-containing compounds — in icy conditions in the lab, then blasted them with radiation akin to that streaming from stars. They found that the organics morphed into the types of molecules that could have jump-started life on Earth.

“The very basic steps needed for the evolution of life may have started in the coldest regions of our universe,” lead author Murthy Gudipati, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., said in a statement. “We were surprised to see organic chemistry brewing up on ice, at these very cold temperatures in our lab.”

The origin of life’s building blocks

Many scientists think that the basic ingredients of life on Earth, including water and organic compounds, ultimately got their start on particles in the freezing outer reaches of the solar system. These particles glommed onto comets and asteroids, then found their way to our planet via long-ago impacts. [7 Theories on the Origin of Life]

The exact steps needed to go from icy organics to life’s building blocks remain unclear, but the new study may shed some light on the basic processes, researchers said. And it shows that the first steps can take place while the organics are still frozen in deep space.

Gudipati and co-author Rui Yang, also of JPL, studied a class of organics called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PAHs are common both on Earth — in candle soot and car exhaust, for example — and in space, having been spotted on comets and asteroids and in the planet-forming disks swirling around newborn stars.

The scientists mimicked the environment PAHs would experience in the quiet spaces between stars, where the molecules have also been detected. They exposed PAHs to temperatures as low as minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 268 degrees Celsius), bombarded the compounds with ultraviolet radiation similar to that thrown off by stars and used a laser system to identify the products of the resulting chemical reactions.

More complex organics

The researchers found that the PAHs had been transformed. The molecules incorporated hydrogen atoms into their structure, becoming more complex organics — a step along the path toward amino acids and nucleotides, the raw materials of proteins and DNA, respectively.

“PAHs are strong, stubborn molecules, so we were surprised to see them undergoing these chemical changes at such freezing-cold temperatures,” Gudipati said.

The study may also help explain why PAHs — which are pervasive throughout the cosmos as gases and on hot dust particles — have not yet been found on ice grains in space. They may be chemically transformed into other complex organics shortly after adhering to the frigid grains, researchers said.

The results are reported in the September issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Follow SPACE.com on Twitter @Spacedotcom. We’re also on Facebook  Google+.

Stanford Organic Study Authors Face Petition to Retract ‘Fatally Flawed’ Study

Two weeks ago I posted at the Knight Science Journalism Tracker on a Stanford study that found that organic food was no more nutritious or less risky than conventionally grown food. Not terribly controversial, I thought; people who like organic food will likely continue to buy it. And those who disagree will look for research that supports their view; no single study provides a definitive answer to these kinds of questions.

I was wrong about all that. According to Rosie Mestel at The Los Angeles Times, the study was followed by “days of heated reaction,” and activists have now launched a petition drive demanding that the researchers retract their “fatally flawed” study.

Mestel reports that activists set up their petition drive at Change.org, a liberal-leaning website (my characterization, not hers) that aims to promote social change. Recent campaigns have successfully opposed credit-card fees, opposed anti-gay discrimination, and supported the Lorax’s pro-tree agenda. The anti-Stanford petition drive tries to link the study to other unrelated issues, such as genetically modified foods, mercury in the food supply, and high-fructose corn syrup, Mestel reports.

Then she neatly proceeds to dismantle the petition. The study, she writes, “wasn’t about the entirety of everything that people think is wrong about the way our food is grown and produced today. It wasn’t even about every type of difference between organic and conventionally grown food. And did we miss something — or didn’t the authors actually report differences that come down in favor of organic food?”

The petition also attempts to link the study to dubious tobacco industry research, claiming that one of its authors developed a technique that allowed tobacco companies to lie with statistics. Mestel demolishes that attempt.

She ends with the lightly edited views of five authorities, including some who criticize the study. Her story charts a clear path for us through a nasty thicket.

Even so, a week after her story appeared, the petition continues to gain signatures. When Mestel wrote her piece on Sept. 12, the petition, she said, had more than 2,900 signatories. It now has 3,724. A similar petition that I stumbled onto at thepetitionsite.com (Stanford! Don’t Lie About Benefits of Organic Foods!) has 1,956 names on it.

Mestel reports that Stanford University has said, “We stand by the work and the study authors.” And she says the study’s authors have not commented on the petition.

This post originally appeared at the Knight Science Journalism Tracker.

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The MGM Grand In Las Vegas Has Unveiled A Line Of ‘Healthy’ Hotel Rooms

Staying in a hotel room at The MGM Grand Hotel Casino in Las Vegas just might make you healthier.

The 5,044-room hotel just underwent a major renovation that includes 41 “Stay Well” rooms with features intended to aid sleeping, reduce allergies, and promote healthy eating, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The new features include:

  • Lights that are skewed toward the red spectrum, which helps calm the brain down before sleep.

  • Antimicrobial coating on door knobs and furniture.

  • Air filter systems.

  • Healthy room service and a mini bar that serves items such as organic, steel-cut oatmeal and a tofu vegetarian sandwich.

  • A shower filter that claims to infuse water with Vitamin C

New York based designers Delos LLC partnered with eight doctors and researchers from Columbia University Medical Center and The Cleveland Clinic to design the rooms, which on average will cost about $30 more a night than a regular room, according to the WSJ.

The hotel sent some photos of the new rooms:

stay well rooms at the mgm grand

Courtesy of MGM Resorts

The Stay Well Grand Suite at the MGM.

stay well rooms at the mgm grand

Courtesy of MGM Resorts

The shower head is infused with Vitamin C.

stay well rooms at the mgm grand

Courtesy of MGM Resorts

The light therapy makes it easier to get back to sleep.

DON’T MISS: Tour The Brand New Bentley Hotel Suite That Costs $9,500 A Night

Nature’s One: Consumer Reports Confirms Undetectable Arsenic in Baby’s Only …

— /PRNewswire/ — Today Consumer Reports released additional information about arsenic and its impact on America’s food supply.  The arsenic testing conducted by Consumer Reports concluded that Baby’s Only Organic® formulas tested safe for a baby’s consumption. “When we tested the new versions of the two dairy formulas, the levels were either undetectable or nearly so,” stated Consumer Reports in its article, Arsenic in your food.

(Photo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20120919/CL77508 )

Nature’s One partners with a supplier that grows one of the purest sources of brown rice worldwide.  “This coupled with our new organic-compliant filtration system has resulted in undetectable levels of arsenic in our organic brown rice syrup,” says Highman.  The company is not disclosing specific information about its new rice supplier.

While there are no FDA regulations that define permissible levels of arsenic in foods, the EPA has established a maximum safe limit for arsenic in drinking water at 10 parts per billion.  Nature’s One test results consistently confirm undetectable levels of arsenic at testing limits of less than 4 parts per billion (ppb).  “We are very happy Consumer Reports’ arsenic testing validates the undetectable test results we’ve received by the independent lab, Applied Speciation Laboratory,” stated Highman.

Although Consumer Reports recommends “that babies eat no more than 1 serving of infant rice cereal per day on average,” parents do not need to limit the intake of organic brown rice syrup used in Baby’s Only Organic formulas.  “Our organic brown rice syrup has undetectable arsenic levels, while rice cereals for babies tested at 110—329 ppb for arsenic according to Consumer Reports,” said Highman. 

Nature’s One is committed to doing organic better than any other company.  “Soy protein can be a bit more challenging than dairy protein; however, our new filtration system is capable of reducing other heavy metals as well, including lead and cadmium,” according to Highman.  The company recently produced Baby’s Only Organic Soy formula using its filtered organic brown rice syrup and achieved arsenic levels at parity with other soy formulas on the U.S. market. 

Organic regulations, which Nature’s One strictly adheres to, prohibit the use of arsenic-containing drugs known to be fed to farm animals as a preventative measure for disease and to increase growth while reducing the quantity of feed an animal consumes.  Conventional farming involves the spreading of manure from animals treated with arsenic laden drugs, which adds to the negative impact commercial fertilizers have on ground water and soils.  These are all practices prohibited by organic laws, but still cause contamination that organic companies must contend with.

This year in an unprecedented move, Nature’s One offered transparency by publicizing its arsenic test results for its organic formulas.  This is just one component of the company’s Pure10 Pledge™ to its customers.  Its Pure10 Pledge is backed with extensive testing, an uncompromising attitude toward ingredient standards, and a commitment to producing the most safe and nutritious formulas for the wellbeing of children. 

About Nature’s One:

Founded in 1997, Nature’s One is the leader in the organic pediatric nutrition industry. Highly regarded for its Baby’s Only Organic® Formulas, Baby’s Only Essentials® Supplements, PediaSmart® Organic Complete Nutrition Beverages, and PediaVance® Organic Electrolyte Solution brands, Nature’s One has spent over 15 years dedicating its resources to the research, development, and production of high quality nutritional solutions for babies and children.

Contact:  Karla Highman   1-740-657-6446

SOURCE Nature’s One